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ADNI 2 Study



Background

The Alzheimer’s Disease Neuroimaging Initiative (ADNI), a landmark study that began in 2004, is a public-private research partnership tasked with identifying biomarkers to detect Alzheimer’s disease (AD). The study has gathered and analyzed thousands of brain scans, genetic profiles and biomarkers in blood and cerebrospinal fluid (CSF). The study was designed to enable researchers to follow AD as it progresses in an individual, from various points in the disease process.

In 2009, ADNI made a significant step forward in providing validation for a test that helps diagnose the beginning stages of AD sooner and more accurately by measuring levels of two biomarkers—tau and beta-amyloid proteins—in cerebrospinal fluid. Biomarkers in cerebrospinal fluid are revealing other changes that could identify which patients with MCI may develop Alzheimer’s.

The ADNI study includes scientists at 55 research centers in U.S. and Canada. Currently the study involves over 800 study participants from those without memory problems to mild cognitive impairment to AD. The study results are expected to provide researchers with a better understanding of AD progression in its earliest stages.

In 2010, funded by the federal stimulus package, the ADNI study moved into the “ADNI GO” phase. The ADNI GO research effort is the first of its kind to focus on participants who exhibit the earliest signs of memory loss in mild cognitive impairment – both thought to be precursors to AD. While the ADNI GO project work continues, the overall ADNI effort is rapidly moving into a third phase – known as “ADNI 2”.

ADNI 2

ADNI 2 will build upon the successes of earlier ADNI phases to identify the earliest signs of Alzheimer’s disease. Researchers are eager to determine when damage to the brain begins. Scientists suspect that identifiable changes to the brain take place well before AD symptoms appear. The ADNI2 phase of the study includes a large number of new volunteers in the earliest stages of cognitive impairment.

Researchers are seeking new volunteers to join those already participating in the study as it enters the ADNI2 phase. The study participants will be followed to define any changes in brain structure and function as people transition from normal cognitive aging to mild cognitive impairment (MCI) to AD. Like the previous phases of the study researchers will use imaging techniques and biomarker measures in blood and CSF specially developed to track changes in the living brain.

ADNI Technologies and Biomarkers

Some of the leading-edge technologies used in the ADNI studies are brain-imaging techniques, such as positron emission tomography (PET), including FDG-PET (which measures glucose metabolism in the brain); PET using a radioactive compound (Florbetapir F 18) that measures brain amyloid accumulation; that measures brain beta-amyloid; and structural MRI. Brain scans are showing scientists how the brain’s structure and function change as AD starts and progresses. Moreover, biomarkers in CSF are revealing other changes that could identify which patients with MCI will develop Alzheimer’s. ADNI 2 researchers are committed to identifying who is at risk for Alzheimer’s and to developing measurements to accurately track the progression of the disease in an individual. Moreover, ADNI 2 researchers hope to develop tests to measure the effectiveness of potential AD treatment interventions.

Volunteering for ADNI 2

ADNI 2 is actively enrolling through August 2013 and the study will run through 2017.

Researchers are looking for 550 volunteers between the ages of 55 and 90:

  • 150 with no apparent memory problems
  • 100 with a significant memory concern
  • 100 with early mild cognitive impairment (eMCI)
  • 150 with late mild cognitive impairment (lMCI)
  • 150 with mild AD

All ADNI 2 volunteers should be:

  • In good general health
  • Fluent in English or Spanish
  • Willing and able to undergo the test procedures)
  • Accompanied by a study partner – a friend or relative who can go with the volunteer to all clinic visits and has at least 10 hours of contact per week with the volunteer.


U.S. Clinical Study Research Sites Participating in the ADNI 2 Study:

StateCityZip CodeLocationContact
ALBirmingham  University of Alabama, Birmingham


Denise Ledlow
(205)934-6223
pdledlow@uab.edu
AZPhoenix  Banner Alzheimer's Institute


Nadira Trncic
(602)839-6853
Nadira.Trncic@bannerhealth.com
AZSun City  Banner Sun Health Research Institute


Sherye Sirrel
(623)832-6522
sherye.sirrel@bannerhealth.com
CAIrvine  University of California, Irvine


Catherine McAdams-Ortiz
(949)824-8726
cmcadams@uci.edu
CALa Jolla  University of California, San Diego


Helen Vanderswag
(858)246-1245
hvanderswag@ucsd.edu
CALos Angeles  University of Southern California


Mauricio Becerra
(323)442-7594
mjbecerr@usc.edu
CALos Angeles  University of California, Los Angeles


Anna Blanken
(310) 794-3548
ablanken@mednet.ucla.edu
CAOrange  University of California, Irvine - Neuropsychiatric Center


Ioana Popica
(714) 456-8517
ipopica@uci.edu
CAPalo Alto  Stanford University


Michael Nolasco
(650) 849-0491
michael.nolasco@va.gov
CASacramento  University of California, Davis


Katharine Vieira
(916)803-3066
kevieira@ucdavis.edu
CASan Francisco  University of California, San Francisco


Jonathan Elofson
(415) 502-7326
jelofson@memory.ucsf.edu
CTNew Haven  Yale University School of Medicine


Martha MacAvoy
(203) 764-8100
martha.macavoy@yale.edu
DCWashington20057 Georgetown University


Kelly Behan
(202)687-0413
keb53@georgetown.edu
DCWashington  Howard University


Saba Wolday
(202) 865-7895
swolday@howard.edu
FLJacksonville  Mayo Clinic, Jacksonville


Tracy Kendall
(904)953-7989
kendall.tracy@mayo.edu
FLMiami Beach  Wien Center for Clinical Research


Maria Greig-Custo
(305)674-2121 Ext. 54480
Maria.Greig-Custo@msmc.com
FLPalm Beach  Premiere Research Institute


Teresa Villena
(561)845-0500 ext 124
tvillena@aol.com
FLTampa33613 University of South Florida - Health Byrd Alzheimer Institute
4001 E. Fletcher Avenue

Jill Smith
(813)974-4355
jsmith10@health.usf.edu
GAAtlanta  Emory University


James Newman
(404) 728-4780
jlnewma@emory.edu
IAIowa City  University of Iowa


Karen Smith
(319)353-5158
karen-ekstam@uiowa.edu
ILChicago  Northwestern University


Kristine Lipowski
(312)503-2486
k-lipowski@northwestern.edu
ILChicago  Rush University Medical Center


Patricia Samuels
(312) 942-3033
Patricia_Samuels@rush.edu
INIndianapolis  Indiana University


Scott Herring
(317)963-7418
sherring@iupui.edu
KSKansas City  University of Kansas


Timothy Welch
(913) 945-6792
twelch@kumc.edu
KYLexington  University of Kentucky


Barbara Martin
(859) 323-0494
barbara.martin@uky.edu
MABoston  Brigham and Women's Hospital


Jonathan Bruno
(617) 732-8085
jmbruno@partners.org
MABoston  Boston University


Meenakshi Chivukula
(617) 638-8390
mvc2010@bu.edu
MDBaltimore  Johns Hopkins University


Daniel D'Agostino II
(410) 502-6161
ddagost1@jhmi.edu
MIAnn Arbor  University of Michigan, Ann Arbor


Joanne Lord
(734)647-7760
jllord@umich.edu
MNRochester  Mayo Clinic, Rochester


Kris Johnson
(507) 284-6407
johnson.kris@mayo.edu
MOSt. Louis  Washington University, St. Louis


Maria Carroll
(314) 286-0246
carrollm@abraxas.wustl.edu
NCDurham  Duke University Medical Center


Cammie Hellegers
(919) 681-3986
helle003@mc.duke.edu
NCWinston-Salem  Wake Forest University Health Sciences


Leslie Gordineer
(336) 713-8477
lgordine@wfubmc.edu
NHLebanon  Dartmouth Medical Center


Mary Hynes
(603) 650-7552
Mary.L.Hynes@hitchcock.org
NVLas Vegas  Cleveland Clinic Lou Ruvo Center for Brain Health


Triny Cooper
(702) 483-6013
coopert4@ccf.org
NYAlbany  Albany Medical College


Paula Malone
(518) 264-1130
malonep@mail.amc.edu
NYAmherst  Dent Neurologic Institute


Michelle Rainka
(716)250-2038
mrainka@dentinstitute.com
NYNew York  Weill Cornell Memory Disorders Program


Erin Hibbard
(212)746-6580
erh2009@med.cornell.edu
NYNew York  Mount Sinai School of Medicine


Kelly Pun
(212) 241-1514
kelly.pun@mssm.edu
NYNew York  New York University Medical Center


Brittany Cerbone
(212)263-5845
Brittany.cerbone@nyumc.org
NYNew York  Columbia University


Martina Azar
(212) 342-0522
ma3319@cumc.columbia.edu
NYNew York  Weill Cornell Memory Disorders Program


Gabriella Arth
(212) 746-6580
gaa3002@med.cornell.edu
NYOrangeburg10962 Nathan Kline Institute for Psychiatric Research
140 Old Orangeburg Road, Bldg. 35

Vita Pomara
(845)398-5582
vpomara@nki.rfmh.org
NYRochester  University of Rochester Medical Center


Bonnie Goldstein
(585)760-6561
Bonnies_goldstein@urmc.rochester.edu
OHCleveland  Case Western Reserve University


Parianne Fatica
(216)464-6474
parianne.fatica@uhhospitals.org
OHColumbus  Ohio State University


Jennifer Icenhour
(614) 293-6882
jennifer.icenhour@osumc.edu
ORPortland  Oregon Health & Science University


Raina Carter
(503) 494-7615
carterra@ohsu.edu
PAPhiladelphia  University of Pennsylvania


Jessica Nunez-Lopez
(215)662-4379
Jessica.Nunez@uphs.upenn.edu
PAPittsburgh  University of Pittsburgh


MaryAnn Oakley
(412) 692-2721
oakleym@upmc.edu
RIProvidence  Rhode Island Hospital


Dana Ayoub
(401) 444-7691
dayoub@lifespan.org
RIProvidence  Butler Hospital Memory and Aging Program


Rosalind Mandelbaum
(401) 455-6403
RMandelbaum@butler.org
SCCharleston  Roper St. Francis Hospital


Arthur Williams
(843)724-2302 ext.6375
Arthur.Williams@rsfh.com
SCCharleston  Roper St. Francis Hospital


Stephen Bagg
(843) 724-2302
Stephen.Bagg@rsfh.com
SCNorth Charleston  Medical University of South Carolina


Arthur Williams
(843)724-2302 ext.6375
Arthur.Williams@rsfh.com
TXDallas  University of Texas, Southwestern MC at Dallas


Jacqueline Rabb
(214) 648-9358
jackie.rabb@utsouthwestern.edu
TXHouston  Baylor College of Medicine


Munir Chowdhury
(713) 798-4734
munirc@bcm.edu
WIMadison  University of Wisconsin


Sandra Harding
(608) 262-4760
sjharding@medicine.wisc.edu



Canadian Clinical Study Research Sites Participating in the ADNI 2 Study:

StateCityZip CodeLocationContact
British ColumbiaVancouverV6T 2B5 University of British Columbia, Clinic for AD & Related


Benita Mudge
(604)822-7990
benita.mudge@vch.ca
OntarioLondonN6C 5J1 Parkwood Hospital


Charlene Bartha
(519)685-4292 x42286
Charlene.Bartha@sjhc.london.on.ca
OntarioLondonN6A 4V2 St. Joseph's Health Center - Cognitive Neurology


Charlene Bartha
(519)685-4292 x42286
Charlene.Bartha@sjhc.london.on.ca
OntarioLondonN6C 5J1 Parkwood Hospital


Patricia Sargeant
(519)685-4292 Ext. 42896
Patricia.sargeant@sjhc.london.on.ca
OntarioLondonN6A 4V2 St. Joseph's Health Center - Cognitive Neurology


Patricia Sargeant
(519)685-4292 Ext. 42896
Patricia.sargeant@sjhc.london.on.ca
OntarioTorontoM4N 3M5 Sunnybrook Health Sciences Centre


Joanne Lawrence
(416) 480-6108
joanne.lawrence@sunnybrook.ca
QuebecMontrealH3T 1E2 McGill University / Jewish General Hospital Memory Clinic


Chris Hosein
(514)340-8222, ext 3621
chosein@jgh.mcgill.ca

For more information on this study go to: