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Alzheimer's Disease Research News



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Dr. Neil Buckholtz of the NIA discusses ADNI in a summary of the recent presentations at the AAIC in Copenhagen and other Alzheimer's research news.
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Exercise may help to keep the brain active in people with an increased risk of developing Alzheimer’s disease, according to a new study conducted by the Cleveland Clinic. The findings suggest that even moderate amounts of physical activity may help to slow the progression of Alzheimer's.
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Mayo Clinic researchers have demonstrated in a mouse model that they can move small-molecule drugs through the blood-brain barrier.
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Incisive article from the NIA on challenges and new strategies for patient recruitment into AD clinical trials.
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A team of researchers from Columbia University Medical Center (CUMC), Weill Cornell Medical College, and Brandeis University has devised a wholly new approach to the treatment of Alzheimer's disease.
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A new online report from the National Institutes of Health (NIH) highlights recent progress in NIH-supported Alzheimer’s disease research.
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Vitamin E in Mild to Moderate AD: Can we slow down functional deterioration? Link to the JAMA article Effect of Vitamin E and Memantine on Functional Decline in Alzheimer Disease
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In the largest-ever genetic analysis conducted on Alzheimer’s disease, an international group of researchers has identified 11 new genes associated with the disorder, doubling the number of known gene variants linked to it.
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NPR interviewed Dr. Reisa Sperling about the upcoming A4 trial and why it is unprecedented in the field of Alzheimer's clinical research.
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The good news on Alzheimer’s: Better ways to diagnose it. Drug trials offer promise.
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Proposed preclinical stages for Alzheimer’s disease work well to predict who is most likely to progress to AD, according to a paper released online by Lancet Neurology.
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The San Diego U-T Editorial Board recently met with Dr. Maria Carillo, who leads the Alzheimer’s Association’s International Research Grant Program; Dr. Paul Aisen, director of the Alzheimer’s Disease Cooperative Study at UC San Diego; and Mary Ball, president/CEO of the San Diego/Imperial Chapter of the Alzheimer’s Association, to discuss promising research that could help prevent the onset of Alzheimer’s.
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Paul Aisen, MD, Director of the ADCS, expands on the significance of the ADCS DAPC independent analysis of the semagacestat trial which was published last week in the New England Journal of Medicine.
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Additional data from the Phase III Gammaglobulin Alzheimer's Partnership (GAP) study, including select analyses of subgroups, biomarker and imaging data, was presented at the Alzheimer's Association International Conference (AAIC) in Boston, Mass.
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Results from NIH-sponsored study of hormone therapy and cognitive decline in early post-menopause published in JAMA Internal Medicine. Wake Forest researchers report no overall sustained benefit or risk to cognitive function from hormone therapy administered to postmenopausal women aged 50 to 55 years.
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U.S. HHS released the National Plan to Address Alzheimer's Disease: 2013 Update. The first-ever National Alzheimer's Plan, initially released in May 2012, was mandated by the bipartisan National Alzheimer's Project Act (P.L. 111-375), which Congress passed unanimously in 2010. The 2013 Update includes a new timeline for achieving its first goal – prevent and effectively treat Alzheimer's disease by 2025 – and a review of progress over the past year. http://aspe.hhs.gov/daltcp/napa/
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When a neuron gets blocked, the delicate harmony that allows the brain to operate seamlessly deteriorates. One result: diseases like Alzheimer's. Understanding such blockages and how "traffic" should flow normally in healthy brain cells could offer hope to people with neurodegenerative diseases. Toward that end, a research team led by University at Buffalo biologist Shermali Gunawardena, PhD, has shown that the protein presenilin plays an important role in controlling neuronal traffic on microtubule highways, a novel function that previously was unknown.
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New research reported in the May 2013 issue of JAMA Neurology suggests another important reason for keeping blood pressure in check. Scientists report that reducing hypertension may ward off amyloid pathology in people who have the e4 version of the ApoE gene.
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Exercise the brain or the body? University of California, San Francisco, scientists compared a mix of vigorous mental and physical exercise with relaxed training to see if any intervention improved the cognitive performance of older adults more than the others. Both seemed to help.
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Call for abstracts is now open for the fall 2013 CTAD conference in San Diego. For more information visit http://www.ctad-alzheimer.com.
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A team of researchers at Weill Cornell Medical College has discovered that amyloid peptides are harmful to the blood vessels that supply the brain with blood in Alzheimer's disease -- thus accelerating cognitive decline by limiting oxygen-rich blood and nutrients. In their animal studies, the investigators reveal how beta amyloid accumulates in blood vessels and how such accumulation and damage might be ultimately prevented.
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A group of researchers from UCLA have discovered a way for professional football players to see how much damage their brains have suffered through a bruising career before it’s too late, according to a new study. The scientists used a chemical marker to measure the degree of brain damage in five retired football players. That marker latches onto the tau proteins that build up in the brain when someone suffers from Alzheimer’s or other cognitive impairments.
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The Alzheimer's Disease Cooperative Study received notice of its grant renewal from the National Institutes of Health. With new research funding from the National Institutes of Health, the nation’s premier Alzheimer’s disease study network will undertake four major studies aimed at finding new treatments for the disease.
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Does ApoE4 Risk Begin in the Womb? The ApoE4 gene makes people prone to Alzheimer’s disease, but scientists don't know when that risk begins to manifest. Could it even be in the womb? New research suggests that the genetic variant can influence brain structure as early as infancy.
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As the new year begins, what sticks in your mind from 2012? What were the lessons that may position AD research for success in 2013 and beyond? Which basic research trends are ascendant? What has not worked? Alzheimer's Research Forum comments on the top AD newsmakers of 2012.
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It's been a mixed year for Alzheimer's research. Some promising drugs failed to stop or even slow the disease. But researchers also found reasons to think that treatments can work if they just start sooner.
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Researchers at Johns Hopkins Medicine surgically implanted a pacemaker-like device into the brain of a patient in the early stages of Alzheimer's disease, the first such operation in the United States.
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Is chronic traumatic encephalopathy (CTE) a new neurodegenerative disease? Many researchers think it may be. A recent conference dedicated specifically to CTE drew a diverse group of experts and the U.S. Surgeon General to the Lou Ruvo Center for Brain Health in Las Vegas, Nevada, the nation's boxing capital, to start a research platform.
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Families participating in the Dominantly Inherited Alzheimer’s Network (DIAN) made an impassioned case for pressing on with clinical trials at two recent gatherings of the network.
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Reisa Sperling M.D., head of the Center for Alzheimer Research and Treatment at Brigham and Women's Hospital in Boston and an associate professor of neurology at Harvard Medical School talks to the HuffPost on the latest outlook for Alzheimer's disease treatment.
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Down syndrome may hold key to new Alzheimer's treatments
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Caregiver Elisabeth Paine speaks eloquently on the Caregivers Speak! radio show about the importance of AD clinical trials and the need for study volunteers. http://www.ecarediary.com/Radio127/Elisabeth-Paine-s-Caregiving-Story.aspx
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Players who spent at least five seasons battling it out in the National Football League (NFL) are three times more likely to die of a neurodegenerative disease than is the general population. Their risk for dying with dementia or amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) hits fourfold.
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It did not pass muster in a large clinical trial in the U.S., and now a similar study in Europe concludes that ginkgo biloba extract does nothing to prevent the onset of Alzheimer’s in older adults at risk for the disease.
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Alzheimer's drugs take a new tack. After a summer marred by disappointing clinical-trial results in patients with Alzheimer’s disease, drug developers are regrouping to plot a fresh course in the battle against the devastating disorder.
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What's Next? Treatment Options for Alzheimer's Disease.
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Dr. Michael Weiner, head of the Alzheimer's Disease Neuroimagining Initiative (ADNI) is interviewed by Future Medicine about the genesis of ADNI and the ground-breaking benefits of this innovative study.
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A public-private partnership to establish biomarkers of dementia in Down's syndrome could aid the development of preventive therapies for the dementia associated with both Down's syndrome and Alzheimer's.
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The Wall Street Journal reports on the False Alzheimer's Diagnosis. More than 100 other conditions, from vitamin and hormone deficiencies to rare brain disorders, can mimic Alzheimer's disease. Some are readily treatable.
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Is there a silver lining to the recent reported failure of Lilly's Alzheimer's drug solanezumab? The Alzheimer's Research Forum discusses the ramifications.
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At the AAIC, held July 14-19, 2012 leaders of three ongoing preclinical treatment initiatives answered questions from a packed audience and from moderator Howard Feldman of the University of British Columbia. Panelists were Paul Aisen of the University of California, San Diego; Reisa Sperling of Harvard Medical School; Randy Bateman of Washington University, St. Louis, Missouri; and Eric Reiman, Pierre Tariot, and Jessica Langbaum of the Banner Alzheimer’s Institute in Phoenix, Arizona.
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Sharp as a tack at age 90. Scientists from Northwestern University's Cognitive Neurology and Alzheimer's Disease Center identified 12 people aged 80 and older who did as well or better on memory tests as people who were 20 to 30 years younger. Researchers dubbed them "SuperAgers. Read more.
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Alzheimer's disease moved from the 6th leading cause of death in 2009 to the 5th leading cause of death of Americans 65 and older in 2012.
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Dr. Michael Weiner, Project Director of the Alzheimer’s Disease Neuroimaging Initiative (ADNI), blogs on the Huffington Post about why it is critically important for people with AD and MCI to volunteer for AD research now.
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Gina Kolata at the New York Times delves into a world of early onset Alzheimer’s and explores its tremendous impact on a family that carries one of the AD genes. Discusses the DIAN project (Dominantly Inherited Alzheimer’s Network) led by Dr. Randy Bateman at Washington University in St. Louis and quotes Dr. Paul Aisen, director of the ADCS.
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4th International Conference on Clinical Trials for Alzheimer’s Disease Begins in San Diego, California, November 5, 2011
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4th International Conference on Clinical Trials for Alzheimer’s Disease Begins in San Diego, California, November 4, 2011
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4th International Conference on Clinical Trials for Alzheimer’s Disease Begins in San Diego, California, November 3, 2011
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Nutritional Intervention Improves Memory in People with Mild Alzheimer’s Disease
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ADNI Enters Its Second Phase
An initiative to find biomarkers of AD progression that researchers and industry describe as a new way to do science is entering its second five year phase. But what makes it so special? Adrian Burton Investigates.
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The Nerve Growth Study comes to the attention of Nightline on ABC. Watch the full interview conducted with a study participant at Georgetown University.
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An in-depth look at how a unique collaborative effort changed the way researchers find and diagnose Alzheimer’s
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Dr. Paul Aisen, Director of the ADCS, encourages people to get involved in clinical trials so preventative treatments for Alzheimer’s disease can be developed
Alzheimer’s Association International Conference on Alzheimer’s Disease 2010.
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Rules Seek to Expand Diagnosis of Alzheimer’s.
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Brain Scan and Dye Can Show AD Plaques That Build Up in Brains of People with Alzheimer’s
A small start-up company might have overcome of the biggest obstacles in diagnosing Alzheimer’s.
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Predicting progression of Alzheimer’s disease
Professor Rachelle Doody and a team of researchers at Baylor College of Medicine have developed an evaluation that reliably predicts future cognition performance and activities of daily living in people with Alzheimer’s disease.
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Alzheimer’s Disease Imaged Long Before Symptoms Appear
Brain imaging finds signs of Alzheimer’s disease years before symptoms develop.
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Continuing Medical Education Dementia Conference
The Memory Disorders Program at Georgetown University is presenting a continuing education dementia conference on February 26, 2010 at the Intercultural Center Auditorium, Georgetown University.
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Predictors of Physician Referral for Patient Recruitment to Alzheimer Disease Clinical Trials
Inadequate recruitment into AD clinical trials is an important threat to the validity and generalization of studies. Understanding physician perceptions of clinical trials is key to the success of a clinical trial.
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Recovery Funds Advance Alzheimer’s Disease Research
American Recovery and Reinvestment Funds are being used to promote the national research efforts to better understand, diagnose and treat Alzheimer’s disease.
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Alzheimer’s Biomarker Initiative Hits Its Stride
An effort to develop biomarkers for Alzheimer’s disease is churning out new data and making plans to expand.
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Skills tests like ’connect the dots’ may be early Alzheimer’s indicator
Researchers at Washington University in St. Louis found that declines in learning skills and other types of thinking may precede Alzheimer’s memory loss.
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Key Brain Receptors Linked To Learning and Memory Decrease with Age
Yale researchers find that important brain receptors are linked to learning and memory decline with age.
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7th Leonard Berg Symposium October 1 - 2, 2009
Presymptomatic Detection of Dominantly Inherited Alzheimer’s Disease.
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Does Caffeine Help Decrease Beta-Amyloid in Alzheimer’s Disease?
Back-to-back studies published in the Journal of Alzheimer’s Disease, show caffeine significantly decreased abnormal levels of beta-amyloid, the protein linked to Alzheimer’s disease, both in the brains and in the blood of mice exhibiting symptoms of the disease.
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Early Warning: Key Alzheimer’s Brain Changes Observed In Unimpaired Older Humans
New research has uncovered an early disruption in the process of memory formation in older humans who exhibit some early brain changes associated with Alzheimer’s disease (AD) but show little or no memory impairment.
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Video Gallery: The HBO Alzheimer’s Project, Alzforum Series
As part of HBO’s The Alzheimer’s Project 18 short films were developed to accompany the longer length films. These short films can be viewed on the Alzheimer’s Research Forum website. They discuss a broad range of Alzheimer’s disease research topics.
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Measuring Brain Atrophy in Patients with Mild Cognitive Impairment
Measuring Brain Atrophy in Patients with Mild Cognitive Impairment Scientists at the University of California, San Diego (UCSD) School of Medicine have shown that a fully automated procedure called Volumetric MRI - which measures the "memory centers" of the brain and compares them to expected size.
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Medical Information in the News: Can You Trust What You Read?
Read the newspaper. Watch television or surf the internet. Medical information abounds. Some is scientifically sound, some based on opinion, and some is incomplete or even misrepresented.
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Update on Recent Developments Regarding Clinical Treatment Trials and Biomarkers
A number of promising new treatments for Alzheimer’s disease (AD) have migrated from early development in the laboratory to being tested in humans.
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The Pulse of Drug Development (HBO Film Documentary)
We sit down with the director of the Alzheimer’s Disease Cooperative Study of the National Institute on Aging to answer questions about the progress being made in drug development, the benefits of participating in clinical trials, and the research being done on herbal remedies.
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Searching for an Alzheimer’s Cure: The Story of Flurizan (HBO Film Documentary)
This film gives us a behind-the-scenes look at the largest Alzheimer’s drug trial to date, what the results were, and what it means for the field.
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Does Neuroglobin Play a Role in Alzheimer’s Disease?
Neuroglobin is a protein that was first identified in 2000. It is a member of the globin family, similar to hemoglobin (which carries oxygen inside red blood cells) and myoglobin (which carries oxygen inside muscle cells).
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Picower-led Team Pinpoints Gene Key to Alzheimer’s-like Reversal
An MIT research team at the Picower Institute for Learning and Memory has identified the gene responsible for the 2007 discovery in which mice with Alzheimer’-like symptoms regained long-term memories and the ability to learn.
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Dr. Paul Aisen Interviewed by San Diego Union Tribune
Dr. Paul Aisen of the ADCS is interviewed by Scott LaFee at the San Diego Union Tribune about the current state of Alzheimer’s disease research.
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Results of the Ginkgo Biloba Phase III Trial
Results of a large, six-year long, randomized trial showed no beneficial effect of Ginkgo biloba in the prevention of Alzheimer’s disease or dementia in subjects with normal cognition or in those with mild cognitive impairment.
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Women with Alzheimer’s More Adversely Affected than Men
A new study has found that women with Alzheimers are more adversely affected than men with the same condition.
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New Study Examines Alzheimer’s Caregiving in Late-Life Re-Marriages
Ann Arbor, Michigan - Late-life remarriage complicates caring for an ailing spouse, according to a University of Michigan researcher who is conducting one of the first known studies to focus on the challenges facing older remarried caregivers - a growing segment of the older U.S. population.
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U.S. Postal Service Issues Alzheimer’s Stamp
The U.S. Postal Service recently issued an Alzheimer’s stamp to raise awareness of the brain-wasting disease and to draw attention to the vital role of the caregiver.
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Why the Amyloid Hypothesis is Alive and Well
There has been much discussion in the news lately as to whether the amyloid hypothesis is the correct path for research.
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Study Finds Improved Cognitive Health among Older Americans
Rates of cognitive impairment among older Americans are on the decline, according to a new study supported by the National Institutes of Health (NIH) comparing the cognitive health of older people in 1993 and 2002.
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Eyes on the prize: Federal Alzheimer’s research effort aims to facilitate interventions
It is fitting that this issue of Alzheimer’s & Dementia honors the life and work of our friend and colleague, Dr. Leon Thal. Leon’s research career, in important and perhaps some surprising ways.
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Vitamin B Does Not Slow Cognitive Decline in Alzheimer’s
Washington (Reuters) - High doses of B vitamins failed to slow cognitive decline in people with Alzheimer’s disease, dashing the hopes for a new weapon against the fatal, mind-robbing ailment, U.S. researchers said on Tuesday.
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Recent Advances in AD Neurobiology
Among the major uncertainties surrounding Alzheimer’s disease is whether and how the amyloid plaques found in the brains of patients with the disorder actually damage neurons.